Styles of Wood Floors

There are three styles of wood floors available on the market today: strip, plank, and parquet. Each style is available in a variety of species, grades and widths, so choosing the right style is simply a matter of which look you prefer.

Strip flooring ranges from 1-½” to 3 1/4” wide, and creates a linear effect in a room. Strip flooring generally is the most popular because it is often the least expensive.

Historically, strip flooring came into fashion during the latter part of the 19th century and, is synonymous with the Victorian era. It ushered in a period of formality to contrast with earlier period’s wider planks.

Plank flooring typically ranges from 3” to 7” or 8” or even wider. While plank flooring is somewhat linear, like strip flooring, its wider widths often create a more casual look.

Historically, wide plank flooring was the original wood flooring style. Now, well over 500 years old, random widths of wide planks were what a round log yielded. The widths of the planks were only limited by the size of the logs available – so, the earliest plank floors were exceptionally wide – while they settled in the 5”-8” range by the 18th century and then slightly narrower in the 19th century.

Parquet and Herringbone flooring can vary in size, and usually generates a geometric, non-linear look. Parquet flooring utilizes smaller pieces of wood than either strip or plank flooring and can be very simple in design, or somewhat complex.

Historically, parquet and herringbone flooring came into use soon after wood flooring was established as a viable flooring option. But, because of the necessary hand-craftsmanship of all those little pieces, it was reserved for only the most formal homes of the wealthy. It is still considered a very formal treatment – but, can be made from many interesting species, including antique reclaimed woods.

CountryPlank.com specializes in Plank Flooring and can provide some species and grades up to 12” wide and wider. We also offer herringbone patterns in many of our species and grades